How To Support Your Staff And Boost Your Business

Do you support your staff members’ needs?

It may be a question that you’ve never had to think about as a lingerie store manager. When you employ people, you have a duty of care toward them. You need to make sure that they are supported in many aspects of their lives. This is not merely an ethical decision; it’s a business one too.

Here’s how looking after the needs of your team can benefit your business:

 

1.  Encourage your staff to live well

Do you consider your employees’ lifestyles and health? The most likely answer is no. As a business owner, you probably have a million things to consider, meaning that your team’s wellness is likely to come bottom of your priority list. Maybe it’s time to change that. Poor staff health costs US companies a massive $260 billion each year, according to reports.

Increasing the productivity of your company means looking after the wellness of your staff and ensuring that they are fit for work. Of course, that is often easier said than done. If you have a large budget, embarking on a company wellness program could be the answer. There are many third-party businesses which can help you install a system that will help your team manage their greater health levels.

On the other hand, if you don’t have that type of cash to splash, you may have to get creative. Offering free fruit at work, giving proper sick pay benefits, and healthcare are small ways you can support your team. Take the time to consider what benefits you can offer your current employees and how that may affect their long-term health.

 

2.  Try to make working flexible

Long gone are the days when people would arrive at work at 9am sharp and leave at 5pm. The modern-day work environment is far more flexible than that. And so it should be. When you’re dealing with a range of personalities and living circumstances in your staff, you need to try your best to accommodate their needs. Of course, you should also make sure that the overall success of the business comes first.

Ask yourself a question: How flexible are the roles that you offer? If we’re considering a sales role, the chances are that the position allows little flexibility. You need your staff to be at work on time and stay for the duration of their shift. While you’re not able to allow these people to work from home, you could give them more of a say over their shift patterns and the working hours they get on a regular basis.

When it comes to other team members – for example, buyers, marketers, and admin staffs – you should consider whether you need them on premises at all. Allowing these staff members to work remotely and choose the hours they work may seem like a dramatic change. However, when you look at the numbers, it could be a winning business plan.

Flexibility could be the key to a more productive workplace. Statistics show that 67% of workers in the US currently wish that they had a flexible situation, i.e. one in which they could either work remotely or have more control over their hours. As though that weren’t enough, more than half of the people surveyed said that they would be more productive if they were able to work off premises.

 

3.  Look after your team’s mental health

Mental health needn’t be a taboo subject. It affects more people than most of us expect. According to stats from the American Institute of Stress, around 40% of workers admit that their job is a cause of stress in their lives. This mental ailment can be linked to poor health and low moods among your workforce, both of which can have a negative impact on productivity levels and, ultimately, your company’s bottom line.

So, how can you support your team members’ mental health? One measure that you can take is checking in with each employee on a regular basis. For example, if you have appraisals with your sales team, take the opportunity to see whether they are content at work or feel that they are stressed. Asking this direct question may not be easy, but it is necessary. Finding out how each team member copes with their workload is essential.

You should also aim to create an environment that fosters openness and trust. When your staff can confide in you, it means that they will feel safe talking to you should they have a personal issue arise. Mental health can be a tricky issue to tackle. But, taking steps toward being open and honest about it, could make all the difference here.

 

Conclusion

Now that you understand the ways in which you can support your team, what are you waiting for? Your staff members are the beating heart of your business. You need to support them and keep them healthy if you want to see excellent results. Why not create a plan for your lingerie store team today? It might be the smartest move for your business yet. 

Tags: Management and Leadership

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Published by

Charlotte Grainger

Charlotte Grainger

Charlotte Grainger is a freelance writer and digital journalist. Her main areas of interest are health, lifestyle, and relationships. When she’s not writing, she loves reading, gymming, and socializing.